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Hotmail was one of the first major web-based email services.

Hotmail was one of the first major web-based email services.

Hotmail was one of the first major web-based email services, launching in 1996. It was developed by Sabeer Bhatia and Jack Smith, and was initially funded by venture capital firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Hotmail was acquired by Microsoft in 1997 and rebranded as MSN Hotmail, later becoming simply Windows Live Hotmail.


The development of Hotmail was a significant moment in the history of the internet, as it allowed users to access their email from any computer with an internet connection, rather than being tied to a specific device or location. This made it much easier for people to stay connected with friends, family, and colleagues, regardless of where they were.



One of the key objectives of Hotmail was to provide a free email service that was easy to use and accessible to anyone with an internet connection. In addition to offering basic email functionality, Hotmail also introduced features such as the ability to send attachments and a customizable interface.


The importance of Hotmail cannot be overstated, as it helped to pave the way for other web-based email services such as Gmail and Yahoo Mail. It was also a major player in the early days of the internet and helped to establish the importance of email as a communication tool.


Today, Hotmail is still in use, although it has been superseded by newer email services that offer more features and functionality. However, it remains a significant part of internet history and is remembered as one of the pioneers of web-based email.

In 2013, Microsoft announced that it was replacing Hotmail with a new email service called Outlook.com. The transition from Hotmail to Outlook.com was completed in early 2013, and Hotmail was officially discontinued as a standalone service.


One of the main reasons for the transition from Hotmail to Outlook.com was to provide users with a more modern and feature-rich email experience. Outlook.com offered a number of improvements over Hotmail, including a cleaner interface, better spam protection, and more storage space.


The transition from Hotmail to Outlook.com was generally smooth and seamless for users. Microsoft provided tools and resources to help Hotmail users migrate their accounts and data to Outlook.com, and many users found that the process was quick and straightforward.


Overall, the transition from Hotmail to Outlook.com was a positive development for Microsoft and its users. Outlook.com has proven to be a popular and reliable email service, and it has helped to keep Microsoft at the forefront of the email market.





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